Judy Skorek, Ed.D.

"The belief that I share with my students is that we are both   
scientists who study theory and research as well as humans  
who are fellow sufferers to the challenges of human life, while 
being practitioners of the healing art of counseling."  
-Judy Skorek, Ed.D.

"The belief that I share with my students is that we are both
scientists who study theory and research as well as humans
who are fellow sufferers to the challenges of human life, while
being practitioners of the healing art of counseling."
-Judy Skorek, Ed.D.

Judy Skorek, Ed.D.
Program Director, MASC
Program Director, Clinical Mental  Health Counseling

As a counselor educator, my current philosophy of teaching and clinical supervision is one of collaborative facilitation where as a group we discuss topics for class centered on our readings and experiences. We learn through interaction and are challenged to examine our own counselor identities. In each class, I welcome input throughout the process. The collective knowledge and experiences of my students are utilized to enhance our work in the classroom. I facilitate discussions and disseminate information to promote students’ knowledge base and stimulate their thinking. It is important to me to develop analytical and critical thinkers who can synthesize information quickly and act on their feet in their work as counselors.

Teaching and modeling ethical principles to beginning counselors, along with enabling them to use these principles in practice, are among my most important tasks. My collaborative style of teaching and supervising serve as a backbone and motivator in my work with counseling students in the academic classroom and in clinical supervision. The belief that I share with my students is that we are both scientists who study theory and research as well as humans who are fellow sufferers to the challenges of human life, while being practitioners of the healing art of counseling. We are counselors and, therefore, must accept the responsibility that our efforts to support and challenge others to grow and change are important responsibilities. It is my hope that my students will fell encouraged to know themselves as they develop their counselor identities and, then as they are ready, challenge themselves to new levels of understanding. I ask that they allow me the same and participate in my growth as a counselor educator and supervisor.

My background includes many years of experience in counseling, teaching, supervising, program development, and leadership. My goals are to resume work on my research interests, to continue to develop the Master of Arts in School Counseling Program at the Adler School to meet the requirements of the Illinois State Board of Education, and to train my students to be reflective practitioners contributing ethically and professionally to society.

I am particularly interested in training my students at the Adler School to become reflective practitioners playing an integral role in their clients’ lives and communities, while serving as advocates and providing community resources to clients, furthering the welfare of others. Central to socially responsible practice and the counselor developmental process is continuous personal and professional reflection. I provide more questions than answers to encourage reflective thinking. Reflectivity includes both thought and the actions that result from it. I have a deep commitment to the personal and professional development of my students.

Please email or call me (312-662-4369) if you have questions or would like more information about me. 

Education

  • Ed. D., Counselor Education and Supervision, Northern Illinois University           
  • M.S. Ed., Counselor Education, Northern Illinois University
  • B.S., Mathematics, University of Illinois              

Professional Memberships

  • American Counseling Association (ACA)
  • American School Counselors Association (ASCA)
  • American Society on Aging (ASA)
  • Illinois Counseling Association (ICA)
  • Illinois School Counselors Association (ISCA)
  • National Career Development Association (NCDA)

Select Presentations

  • Why work? Why not! Older Adults Tell It Like It Is. American Society on Aging, Chicago, IL, March 2013.
  • What Human Resource Professionals Need to Know About Workplace Bullying. DeKalb County Human Resource Managers Association, DeKalb, IL, April 2010. 
  • Counseling Interventions Used to Assist Targets of Workplace Bullying. Northern Illinois Employee Assistance Professionals Association, Glenview, IL, October 2008.
  • Honoring the Community of Safe Campus Environments for Students and Employees: Identifying and Preventing Workplace Bullying. National Career Development Association, Chicago, IL, July 2006.
  • Building Safe Campus Environments for Students and Employees: Identifying and Preventing Workplace Bullying. National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, Schaumburg, IL, October 2005.

Core Faculty

Tsui-Yee Chow, Ed.D.
Chicago Campus

Tsui-Yee Chow, Ed.D.
Chicago Campus

Christina Jackson-Bailey, Ph.D.
Chicago Campus

Christina Jackson-Bailey, Ph.D.
Chicago Campus

Brian Price, Ph.D.
Chicago Campus

Brian Price, Ph.D.
Chicago Campus

Associate Faculty

Paul Fitzgerald, Psy.D.
Chicago Campus

Paul Fitzgerald, Psy.D.
Chicago Campus

Cecil Thomas, M.A.
Chicago Campus

Cecil Thomas, M.A.
Chicago Campus